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Property Issues
 

Real Estate and Timeshares: U.S. citizens should exercise caution before entering into any commitment to purchase property in Mexico. We recommend hiring competent Mexican legal counsel to advise you because Mexican real estate law differs significantly from U.S. law. For more information, please consult the Consular Information Sheet for Mexico.

Boat registration: If you are sailing or boating to Mexico, you must follow Mexican regulations for the temporary import of your vessel. Failure to obtain a permit and follow the import regulations could result in the detention of your vessel. More information is available from the Mexican government here: http://www.sat.gob.mx/aduanas/vehiculos/importacion_temporal/Paginas/embarcaciones.aspx

 PROFECO, the Mexican Consumer Protection Agency, has published a brochure which gives more information about buying a timeshare in Mexico. The brochure can be accessed at PROFECO's website: http://www.profeco.gob.mx/. Follow the link for English and find the brochure entitled: "Take your Time When Buying a Timeshare."

American citizens who experience problems with timeshare companies can file a formal complaint against the company with PROFECO. PROFECO has the authority to mediate disputes, investigate consumer complains, order hearings, and, levy fines and sanctions for not appearing at hearings. All complaints by U.S. citizens are handled by PROFECO's English-speaking office in Mexico City:

From Mexico: (01-55) 5625-6700, ext 1317
From the U.S.: 011-52-55-5625-6700, ext 1317
or via email at
extranjeros@profeco.gob.mx; extranjeroscare@gmail.com

We strongly suggest you contact PROFECO via email to maintain a record of your communications. A telephone call cannot be verified.

Stolen Vehicles: In 1981, the U.S. and Mexican governments signed a treaty regarding recovery of stolen vehicles and aircraft. If a vehicle that is stolen in the U.S. is taken to Mexico and recovered by Mexican law enforcement, the Embassy works with the legal owner to return it to the U.S. Unfortunately, the Embassy does not have the resources to conduct independent investigations. Owners of stolen vehicles should file a report with their local police department and notify their insurance agency.

Banking: If you are having problems with a bank account in Mexico, you may contact the CONDUSEF (National Commission for the Protection of Users of Financial Services) telephone toll free from any location inside Mexico: 01 800 999 80 80; From Mexico City: 5340-0999. Webpage:
www.condusef.gob.mx